National Anzac Centre

The National Anzac Centre is a striking contemporary landmark that sits atop Mt Clarence overlooking King George Sound, from where the first convoy carrying Anzac troops departed in 1914.

For many soldiers, their last sight of Australia was of Mt Clarence on the horizon before they sailed on to take part in landings at Gallipoli from 25 April 1915. It has become a landmark that is intrinsically part of the Anzac story. The National Anzac Centre became an important site in the telling of this story when it was opened on 1 November 2014 to mark the 100th anniversary of the departure of the first convoy.

The Centre is a single level building perched on columns on a sloping hill that reaches out over the landscape with two large windows giving sweeping views. Both the materials used and the sleeved building forms evoke maritime themes – a ship at dock connected to the land via an existing gangplank.

The impressive building features large galleries, curtain wall windows, exhibition spaces, outdoor observation areas and art interpretive systems all overlooking panoramic views of King George Sound. Through multi-media, online experiences and interactive technology, the stories of 32 people who served in the First World War, are brought to life.

The National Anzac Centre was one of a handful of Australian attractions included on a list of 26 must-see new experiences as part of the Lonely Planet e-book New in Travel 2015 and has been named Australia’s number one museum by TripAdvisor users.

Both the materials used and the sleeved building forms evoke maritime themes.

For many soldiers, their last sight of Australia was of Mt Clarence on the horizon before they sailed on to Gallipoli.